The Center for Research on Men’s Health at Vanderbilt University is a university-wide research center with a two-pronged …

Person-specific obesity treatment for middle-aged African American and Latino men

The Center for Research on Men’s Health at Vanderbilt University is a university-wide research center with a two-pronged mission to promote men’s health and reduce health disparities that specializes in individually tailoring health promotion interventions to men. This pilot study – which is the first rigorously designed, community-based weight-loss intervention for obese African American and Latino men ages 40-59 – will compare the efficacy of the intervention to an attention control group in a 6-month randomized-controlled trial. The study also includes the first health communications gender-tailored on deeper social and cultural aspects of masculinity that recognizes the heterogeneity among African American and Latino men, and explores if there is a positive correlation between genetically predicted BMI and BMI measured at baseline. We hypothesize that men assigned to the pilot intervention will lose more weight and demonstrate and maintain greater improvements in blood glucose levels, adiposity, healthy eating, physical activity, and psychosocial mediators (e.g., self-efficacy, social support, motivation) than those randomized to the attention control group.

 Specific Aims:

  1. Develop and test a bank of gendered, culturally and contextually relevant person-specific messages to educate and motivate Latino men to engage in healthier eating and physical activity. These steps will mirror the qualitative ones we have used for the same age group of African American men
  2. Assess the effectiveness of a person-specific, randomized controlled pilot weight loss study of 80 African American and 80 Latino men; to compare changes in HbA1c, diabetes risk behaviors (e.g., diet and physical activity), adiposity measures (e.g., body fat), and psychosocial mediators (e.g., social support, autonomous motivation) between data collected at baseline and at 6-months
  3. Examine the impact of the intervention by conducting a rigorous evaluation to determine the extent of intervention reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation and maintenance (RE-AIM)
  4. Construct a polygenic predictor BMI and test the hypothesis that there will be a positive correlation between genetically predicted BMI and BMI measured at baseline

Research Team:

Investigators 

Key Study Personnel

Next Steps:

  1. Complete formative research in Miami, FL
  2. Conduct a pilot intervention in Nashville, TN and Miami, FL